What makes you click an empirical analysis of online dating

Moreover, men do not value women’s intelligence or ambition when it exceeds their own.

The data set contains detailed information on user attributes such as income, education, physique, and attractiveness, as well as information on the users' religion, political inclination, etc.

The data set also contains a detailed record of all online activities of the users.

I show how to use equilibrium data on who matches with whom for semiparametric estimation of match production functions in many-to-many, two-sided matching games with transferable utility.

This paper uses a novel data set obtained from a major online dating service to draw inferences on mate preferences and ultimately the match outcomes of the site users.

We ¯rst compare the reported demographic characteristics of site users to the characteristics of the population-at-large, and do not ¯nd large di®erences.

We then use regression analysis to investigate how user attributes are related to \outcomes", for example the rate at which a user is approached by potential mates.We provide some conditions under which the results of these \outcome regressions" can be interpreted as preference estimates.This paper uses a novel data set obtained from a major online dating service to draw inferences on mate preferences and the match outcomes of the site users.Women put greater weight on ..." We study dating behavior using data from a Speed Dating experiment where we generate random matching of subjects and create random variation in the number of potential partners.Women put greater weight on the intelligence and the race of partner, while men respond more to physical attractiveness.(formerly Applied Microeconomics Workshop) | 2004/05 | 2005/06 | 2006/07 | 2007/08 | 2008/09 | 2009/10 | 2010/11 | 2011/12 | To find the Archives for more recent years, go to the Events/Seminars page and scroll to the bottom, Past Events Chris Knittel, MIT Sloan School, “Cleaning the Bathwater with the Baby: The Health Co-Benefits of Carbon Pricing in Transportation” (with Ryan Sandle) [Paper] Joint with Environmental Economics Seminar David Laibson, Harvard University, “Shrouded Attributes and Information Suppression in Competitive Markets” (with Xavier Gabaix) [Paper].